Cycas Revoluta

Needs little water
Semi-shade, no direct sunlight
Not air-purifying
Nutrition every month (summer)
Not toxic for animals
Repot every three year
See our collection of Cycas Revoluta

Intro

The cycas, also called palm fern, grow very well in our climate, despite the fact that the cycas is a slow grower. The maximum height the Cycas can reach is 3 meters. However, this takes a very long time, up to 100 years, so the palm will most likely survive you.  The cycas can be on the terrace from mid-May to October. In winter, the cycas should be in a frost-free place "despite its winter hardness". However, the cycas can also be placed in the home or office in winter "as a precaution".

Overwintering large plants is best done in an unheated garage or under a roof. If necessary, you can wrap the pot with insulation material.

Location

The Cycas prefers to receive enough light, but not too much direct sunlight. In any case, never place the plant directly near the window, but put on the guide jelly so that the plant can get used to it. A spot 2 to 3 meters from a window on the west or east is ideal. A south-facing window is a little further away. For a window on the north it doesn't have to take that much distance. 0 to 1 meter will be fine then. When the plant gets too little light, the leaves will become extremely long. Cut them short and place the plant closer to the window if this occurs. It is even possible to put the plant outside in the summer months. Try to avoid the midday sun.


Cycas Revoluta care


Temperature

A minimum temperature of 5 degrees Celsius is recommended during the day and it should not freeze at night.

Watering

The Cycas uses little water. Always water the plant again when the soil has completely dried out again. In winter the soil can be dry for a while, about 1 to 2 weeks, and in summer you can water again when the soil feels dry. There should be no layer of water underneath the pot, this is bad for the roots. For this plant it is generally better to water a little less than too much. The plant is very sensitive to too much water, and a little less water it can have.

Spraying

It is recommended to water the plant occasionally. This improves the ornamental value and keeps pests away. It is not necessary.

Pruning

It happens that leaves turn yellow. This does not have much to do with the care (it is possible) but is a natural process. The leaf simply gets older. It is important to remove these yellow leaves, so that the plant does not lose unnecessary energy to old leaves.

Nutrition

The Cycas does not grow as fast and therefore needs a little less nutrition than other plants. In the winter it is not necessary to give extra nutrients, because the plant will be in the resting position and will consume little energy. The other nutrients will be in the soil which is bad for the roots. In the summer you can choose to add some extra plant nutrition once a month. Just use a lot less than indicated on the packaging.

Repotting

Repot the Cycas about once every 3 years. Use a new pot that is 20% wider than the old pot, so that the roots have enough space to grow further. Always pot in the spring, so that the plant still has enough time to recover from any damage.

Origin

The Cycas Revoluta originates from Japan and is family of the Cycadaceae. It is a very old variety and can last a lifetime in your home, provided you take good care of this plant!

The plant makes long leaves that unfold "like ferns". The plant prefers to stand in a large tub so that it can make good roots.

Do not touch the leaves of the Cycas Revoluta too much with your hands, otherwise they will turn brown.

The cycas revoluta is a particularly beautiful and strong palm.


Diseases

The Cycas Revoluta can be sensitive to certain pests. To prevent vermin it is wise to spray regularly. If pests do occur, it is wise to combat them immediately by means of a biological or, if desired, a chemical pesticide.

Suitable plant nutrition for Cycas Revoluta


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